Oh Hai! We are A Parede, a brazilian design research duo currently living in Berlin. Our research interests fall within decolonial thought, radical pedagogies, gender, and sound studies.

Drop us a line for collaborations, requests, ideas and/or general friendliness: hello@a-pare.de

Our Current Research:

How may Design Research help us prepare ourselves for a State of Exception? “Design in Times of Crisis” is an ongoing project framing an immediate presente/near-future Brazil.

The first outcome of this year-long research is a speculative timeline set in 2038 Brazil.

We are also collecting evidences on a Tumblr Blog. Main sources are the living dystopias our friends and families have to endure everyday back home.

Other Featured Content:

In Brazil, the Statute of the Unborn changes everything. Life is now legally defined as beginning at the moment of conception. Abortion has always been illegal, but now its definition is broader. The morning after pill and the IUD have been outlawed because they may prevent a fertilized egg from successfully implanting and developing. Even the birth control pill is now a highly controlled medication due to fears that it might be used – in higher doses – for the same purposes of the morning after pill.

Oniria is the first product to be released under the new legislation. Distributed through the country’s public healthcare system, Oniria consists of two parts: a small device which is clipped to the corner of the lips at night and tracks basal body temperature and hormonal levels; and an app that calculates when ovulation is supposed to happen based on the data collected by the device. The information is transmitted to the patient’s healthcare provider; in order to access this information, patients must contact their doctor. However, some premium versions of the product – not available in the public healthcare system – allow the patient direct access to their cycle data.

The “Ocupação Algerinha” or “Vila Algerinha”, formerly known as “Ocupação Dona Algerinha” was one of the biggest occupations in South America in the first decades of the twentieth-first century. During its five-year existence, the occupation was home to around 120.000 people, distributed over an area of approximately 1.33 square kilometers in Southeastern Brazil. The exact origins of the occupation are unknown, but it is believed that the families were initially part of a transmigrational group in Latin America which, in itself, was dissident from a larger group of families directly affected by the housing crisis that followed the wave of Coups d’Etat all over the continent. Due to increased incentives to real estate markets, progressive gentrification in big cities, and the suspension of most social housing programmes in South America, thousands of families – many of whom also unemployed – were forcefully expropriated from their homes, and hence started waves of peregrination and demonstrations all over the continent, particularly in the Southern Cone and Brazil.

This is an experimental format for academic publications in/with/through sound, developed in Copenhagen in 2015 as part of the “Fluid Sounds, Fluid States” conference, and later edited in Berlin. The format follows insights I’ve developed in my article published in Design Issues. The “Audio Paper Manifesto” written by the organizers can also be read here.

This audio paper is an experimental fusion of Speculative and Critical Design (SCD) with sound-based research methods. It is part of an ongoing investigation into the politics of designing for sound, and its accountability for the configuration of violent soundscapes.

Image credit: Graphics by Signe Lupnov, photo by Sanne Krogh Groth

In September 2015 we were invited by Rachel Uwa from the School of Machines, Making & Make-Believe to give a talk on “world-creation”, under their 2015 Program “Fabricating Empathy.” Joining us in this talk/panel was designer and former RCA alumni Sascha Pohflepp, as well as the program’s instructors Sitraka Rakotoniaina and Andrew Friend.

We decided to shift the theme’s focus to “world negation” instead, particularly focusing on the refugee crisis (at the time only starting to be discussed in Germany/EU), and the negation of human rights in Brazil.

Speculative design is going through a troubled adolescence. Roughly fifteen years after interaction design duo Dunne and Raby first started talking about “critical design”, the field seems to have grown up a bit too spoiled and self-centered. Being a fairly young approach to product and interaction design, it seems to have reached a tipping point of confusion, rebellion, contrasting opinions and confrontations. Presently, from practitioners to theorists there seems to be little consensus about what the field is able to offer – and whether it is of any use at all. In this article we hope to pinpoint some reasons why this is so, while at the same time offering not possible, plausible or probable but preferable developments for the field.

Contribution to the 1st Edition of “Modes of Criticism“. Check their Website to order a copy, or get the full article at academia.edu.

Photo credit: Francisco Laranjo/Modes of Criticism