We are A Parede, a brazilian research duo and pedagogical practice currently based in Berlin. We are also co-founders of the Decolonising Design platform.

For collaborations, requests, ideas: hello@a-pare.de

Artistic Research

In Brazil, the Statute of the Unborn changes everything. Life is now legally defined as beginning at the moment of conception. Abortion has always been illegal, but now its definition is broader. The morning after pill and the IUD have been outlawed because they may prevent a fertilized egg from successfully implanting and developing. Even the birth control pill is now a highly controlled medication due to fears that it might be used – in higher doses – for the same purposes of the morning after pill.

Oniria is the first product to be released under the new legislation. Distributed through the country’s public healthcare system, Oniria consists of two parts: a small device which is clipped to the corner of the lips at night and tracks basal body temperature and hormonal levels; and an app that calculates when ovulation is supposed to happen based on the data collected by the device. The information is transmitted to the patient’s healthcare provider; in order to access this information, patients must contact their doctor. However, some premium versions of the product – not available in the public healthcare system – allow the patient direct access to their cycle data.

The “Ocupação Algerinha” or “Vila Algerinha”, formerly known as “Ocupação Dona Algerinha” was one of the biggest occupations in South America in the first decades of the twentieth-first century. During its five-year existence, the occupation was home to around 120.000 people, distributed over an area of approximately 1.33 square kilometers in Southeastern Brazil. The exact origins of the occupation are unknown, but it is believed that the families were initially part of a transmigrational group in Latin America which, in itself, was dissident from a larger group of families directly affected by the housing crisis that followed the wave of Coups d’Etat all over the continent. Due to increased incentives to real estate markets, progressive gentrification in big cities, and the suspension of most social housing programmes in South America, thousands of families – many of whom also unemployed – were forcefully expropriated from their homes, and hence started waves of peregrination and demonstrations all over the continent, particularly in the Southern Cone and Brazil.

This is an experimental format for academic publications in/with/through sound, developed in Copenhagen in 2015 as part of the “Fluid Sounds, Fluid States” conference, and later edited in Berlin. The format follows insights I’ve developed in my article published in Design Issues. The “Audio Paper Manifesto” written by the organizers can also be read here.

This audio paper is an experimental fusion of Speculative and Critical Design (SCD) with sound-based research methods. It is part of an ongoing investigation into the politics of designing for sound, and its accountability for the configuration of violent soundscapes.

Image credit: Graphics by Signe Lupnov, photo by Sanne Krogh Groth

What would be the social and political tensions Brasil would face twenty-something years from now, should a highly conservative and neoliberal coalition rule the country?

(Para ver a versão em Português, clique aqui)

This is a series of objects that confront and reclaim sonic space. It starts from a very simple observation: that silence is never a dialogue, but an imposition. Silencing is an attitude observed in a lot of instances in society, but more often than not it concerns issues of gender, class and ethnicity. Latin americans in the US, turkish and middle-eastern people in northern Europe, women in general – these are all subjects of constant angry looks, reprimand and shushing. We are constantly deemed as “loud”, “annoying”, “uneducated” and other less friendly adjectives.

These objects are meant to allow a reconquering of this stolen sonic space – and they do so by also occupying physical space.